Product Roadmaps

You may love Agile for its flexibility and fluid requirements processes. Still, Agile has its exhibits that document your project’s path to success — Agile, after all, requires more documentation and holds the team more accountable than other methodologies do. One piece of documentation, though, gets overlooked more than others because it echoes that Waterfall feel: the product roadmap.

What an Agile Product Roadmap Is

In case you haven’t heard of it, a product roadmap is an extremely high-level view of your product’s path. It outlines basic steps and delivery deadlines to help everyone on the team stay focused on when certain steps need to happen for the project to succeed.

In Waterfall, the project manager develops this high-level outline and typically morphs it into a detailed, start-to-finish project plan. An Agile roadmap, on the other hand, comes from the product owner (with input from developers, of course). It’s a flexible timeline that builds automatic categories for the backlog and filters out requirements that don’t lead to the project’s overall success. Use it as a buy-in tool that helps your team get the budget and resources it needs and something to point to when executives say they want a new feature that doesn’t tie into the project’s goals.